Where institutions should have consensus on cases of sexual violence

Where institutions should have consensus on cases of sexual violence

A significant amount of debate exists on Canadian campuses around how schools should review or administer discipline in cases of reported sexual assault, yet one area where there is consensus, yet perhaps not enough attention, is the importance of supporting survivors at the moment of disclosing an assault. The need for training in this area was recently highlighted by a survey of Ontario students that found that 63% of university and 50% of college students reported experiencing sexual harassment during their time at school. That’s why an initiative at Western University is working to ensure that any member of the campus community is prepared to offer a supportive response if someone discloses an experience of sexual violence to them.

Leading the Way in Post-Secondary’s Changing MarCom Landscape

Leading the Way in Post-Secondary’s Changing MarCom Landscape

The world of marketing and communications in post-secondary education is changing rapidly. Growing competition to attract the best students, combined with a renewed focus on institutional mission and strategic enrolment management, has created a new kind of marketing and communications professional, one who must keep up with a fast-changing world driven by collaboration and innovation.

Making an impact on the Ontario college system

Making an impact on the Ontario college system

Graduates of Central Michigan University’s (CMU) Master of Arts in Education with a Community College concentration program are continuing to shape and change the Ontario college system. One such graduate, Mary Pierce, is having her capstone research on academic integrity intervention referenced by several Ontario community colleges, and presented at the Ontario College Administrative Staff Association Leaders and Innovators Conference in June 2019.

How international faculty projects can change lives at home and abroad

How international faculty projects can change lives at home and abroad

In a remote area of Nepal, an eight-year-old boy is carried into a tiny hospital by his grandparents. The boy has fallen from a height and sustained a complex fracture in his elbow. Treating the injury will require resetting and stabilizing bones, but this involves a specialized surgery and medical hardware not available to the only doctor in the area, whose hospital is hours away from the nearest city or specialist. Worse yet, the boy’s circulation has been impeded by the fracture, and without treatment, he will lose the use of his hand and forearm.

True leadership takes a commitment to learning.

True leadership takes a commitment to learning.

Vision: it’s what William G. Davis had when establishing the Ontario college system; and it’s what Dr. Roy Giroux had when first inviting Central Michigan University to deliver the Master of Arts degree in Education to the faculty, administrators and staff at St. Clair College in Windsor, Ontario. Dr. Giroux believed all Ontario college professionals should be afforded the opportunity to pursue advanced training and enhance their professional practice.

Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Assault on Campus

Responding to Disclosures of Sexual Assault on Campus

Every day, people across Canada make the brave decision to tell someone about their experience of sexual violence. The conversation might last only a minute, but it can have a long-lasting impact on the survivor. If a survivor doesn’t get a supportive response, they might never tell anyone again, or might blame themselves for what happened to them. A supportive response, on the other hand, can affirm that person’s experience and can help them find the supports they need.

Which is the best city in Canada for youth to work?

Which is the best city in Canada for youth to work?

We know that the world of work is changing, and that the jobs of the future will be vastly different than today’s. We know, too, that educators, policy makers, and change-makers share a collective responsibility to help young people prepare for this changing world, but how about our cities? How are our Canadian cities preparing for the future of work, and how do they fare as places for young people to work and gain an education? What makes a healthy, vibrant, youthful city?

For a country to develop, so must its post-secondary institutions

For a country to develop, so must its post-secondary institutions

Higher education advocates across Canada and beyond will often claim that academics make an enormous impact on the world beyond the ivory tower, but skeptics are often quick to ask, “How, exactly?” Advocates might then point to social benefits such as advancements in medical technology or the fostering of an engaged democratic citizenry, but another benefit that they might wish to highlight is the impact that higher education is having in developing countries that are looking to build healthier, wealthier, and more just societies for all.  

Canadian higher ed professionals share their thoughts on professional development

Canadian higher ed professionals share their thoughts on professional development

Look anywhere in the media today and you’ll find people talking about how upskilling and ongoing professional development is a core component of any 21st-century profession. On top of that, many believe that positive attitudes toward professional development can be a key indicator of the health of a certain profession. In keeping with Academica’s core mission of moving higher ed forward, we partnered with Extended Education at the University of Manitoba and went out to our Top Ten readership community to ask higher ed professionals across Canada about their attitudes toward professional development.

Connecting university boards to student wellness

Connecting university boards to student wellness

Every day, members of Canada’s university boards make decisions that impact the lives of students, staff, faculty, and the communities they serve. Today, these board members come from a much more diverse set of backgrounds than they might have 30 years ago. Combined with the unprecedented pressures that universities currently face from a number of directions, it is essential that Canada’s university board members are up-to-speed on the challenges that most impact their stakeholders and, just as importantly, the possible solutions. One such area where board members can have a major impact is student wellness.

Students weigh Ontario’s tuition cut against its costs

Students weigh Ontario’s tuition cut against its costs

Ontario’s Progressive Conservative government recently announced a slate of changes to post-secondary education in the province, which included a 10% tuition cut, changes to the Ontario Student Assistance program, and a clause that would allow students to opt out of paying certain non-mandatory student fees at their institutions. To gain further insight into the proposed changes, we reached out to our StudentVu panel to learn more about what Ontario post-secondary students think about the new changes. We received 652 responses from students currently studying at colleges and universities across Ontario.

A University as It Might Be

A University as It Might Be

In the wake of the Ontario Government’s shock announcement of a 10% cut in university tuition, next week Brampton City Councillors will agree terms of reference for a task force to come up with a new game plan for post-secondary education in the City.  The Brampton initiative is a direct response to the disappointment felt at all levels in the city when hopes for a branch campus of Ryerson University were dashed last October. The latest policy announcements from Queens Park simply add to the urgency for communities across the province to come up with new ways to harness university and college education for the public good.  Former university president David Wheeler argues that this is the moment for Brampton to launch a bold new experiment in university education that could act as a beacon for 21st century university education for the rest of the country.

Bridging the Skills Gap

Bridging the Skills Gap

Whether in the midst of their first or final year of post-secondary education, the new year for students often signals a new job search. This search can encompass anything from a summer job to help pay expenses, or a first career opportunity.  Whatever their road map, confronting and addressing the skills gap will undoubtedly be part of a graduate’s journey. We know that this gap exists, but how can we help young people better understand the skills they have, and how can we better equip them with the tools and resources they need to succeed?

Keeping university boards well-informed is no small task

Keeping university boards well-informed is no small task

Board members at universities across Canada face a growing urgency to make the best decisions for their institutions. These members are coming from an increasingly diverse set of professional and personal backgrounds, which makes it more essential than ever for them to be well-informed about the challenges and opportunities facing their schools. And if there’s one Canadian university alumnus who knows something about keeping people well-informed, it's Ali Velshi of NBC News. This May 2-4, Velshi will return to his Alma Mater in Kingston, Ontario to to discuss the future of internationalization at Canadian universities at the Canadian University Boards Association’s annual conference.

2018 Canadian Higher Education Year in Review

2018 Canadian Higher Education Year in Review

We’ve selected the top ten stories of 2018 using the same process we use for choosing stories in our Academica Top Ten and Indigenous Top Ten publications. To begin, we drew on the expertise of our team of researchers and consultants, who spent 2018 working with clients at over 100 post-secondary schools across Canada to solve institutional challenges and move higher ed forward. We combined this expert insight with user traffic data gathered from 30,000+ Top Ten readers and over 7.5 million Top Ten emails that went out in 2018, creating a selection process that draws on unparalleled access to both an on-the-ground understanding and bird’s-eye-view of the biggest challenges and opportunities facing Canadian higher ed.

2018 Indigenous Education Year in Review

2018 Indigenous Education Year in Review

Landmark education agreements, community partnerships, and language revitalization initiatives made 2018 a big year for Indigenous/Settler relations in the post-TRC era, but the past 12 months also presented significant challenges for post-secondary education. High-profile resignations at schools across Canada revealed the extent to which systemic racism permeates our institutions’ structures, while incidents of racism on a number of Canadian campuses pointed to ongoing tensions between Indigenous populations and Settlers.

Better Boards, Better Universities

Better Boards, Better Universities

One of the most influential—yet least understood—groups of decision-makers at Canadian universities is the board of directors. In this world of constrained (and sometimes shrinking) resources, board members know that the future of their universities, and of Canadian higher education, can depend on the decisions they make. This is the challenge that the Canadian University Boards Association (CUBA) seeks to address. The association supports effective governance in higher education by providing board members with resources, professional networks, and a forum for exchanging perspectives and information, its annual conference, which will be hosted by Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario May 2-4, 2019

Newly minted graduates need help on the job market

Newly minted graduates need help on the job market

With Ontario Premier Doug Ford set to repeal Bill 148, precarious and vulnerable workers are back in the news. A recent study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), reveals that 1 in 5 professionals in Canada have precarious jobs. As Ricardo Tranjan, co-author of the study, noted, “We are talking about people here who quote-unquote 'did everything right,'...They went to university, they passed professional exams, they were told they would have a job waiting for them. And it's not necessarily there.”